Galileo's Science Café

Hear about the latest findings surrounding hot topics in science and medicine that affect our everyday lives and the decisions that we make! Bring your family and friends for a free, casual, interactive science discussion. Learn from the experts and speak with them.

Location: Hylton Performing Arts Center, 10960 George Mason Circle, Manassas, Virginia

Time:
6:00 PM: Doors open, food, and beverages available
7:00PM-7:30 PM: Scientific Discussion
7:30PM-7:45 PM: Q&A
7:45PM-8:30 PM: Meet the Scientist and Networking Reception

2018-2019 Series
Proudly sponsored by C. Daniel and Juliann Clemente

September 20, 2018:  Immigrants to America and Their Contributions to ScienceAn Overview of Recent Data and Policy  By: Dr.James Witte and Dr.Michele Waslin  (RSVP)

October 25, 2018: From Cyanobacteria Blooms to Clear Water: The Remarkable Story of the Tidal Potomac River Recovery  By: Dr. Christian Jones (RSVP)

November 1, 2018: What Social Media Feeds Tell Us in Times of Crisis (tentative date and title)
By: Dr. Anthony Stefanidis (RSVP)

January 24, 2019: The Science of How People Change: Stories from Those Who Have Been Incarcerated
By Dr. Faye Taxman (RSVP)

February 21, 2019: Earth's Climate, Where Has It Come From and Where Is It Going?
By: Dr. Natalie Burls  (RSVP)

March 21, 2019: Sports-Related Concussion and Kids: Staying Ahead of the Game
By: Dr. Shane Caswell (RSVP)

April 18, 2019: Fighting Addiction
By: Dr. Lora Peppard  (RSVP)

May 16, 2019: The NASA/New Horizons Flyby of Dwarf Ice Planet 2014MU69 (Ultima Thule): Our New View of the Outer Solar System
By: Dr. Michael Summers  (RSVP)

 

Science Cafe Abstracts 

 

September 20, 2018:  Immigrants to America and Their Contributions to Science:  An Overview of Recent Data and Policy   (RSVP)  By: James Witte, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Director for the Institute for Immigration Research  and Michele Waslin, Ph.D., Program Coordinator, Institute for Immigration Research, George Mason University

 From graduate students and postdoctoral students in university labs and classrooms to pharmaceutical researchers and software engineers to America’s Nobel Prize winners,  foreign-born scientists are a critical part of the nation’s scientific community.  This talk will detail some of the specifics of these contributions to date, and potential contributions   New American scientists may make in the future. We will also examine the role that federal immigration policies have played in furthering these contributions and the extent to which the changing immigration climate threatens the scientific community here and abroad.  

 

October 25, 2018: From Cyanobacteria Blooms to Clear Water: The Remarkable Story of the Tidal Potomac River Recovery  By: Dr. Christian Jones,  Professor and Director, Potomac Environmental Research and Education Center, George Mason University (RSVP)  Abstract available soon!

 

 

 

 

November 1, 2018: What Social Media Feeds Tell Us in Times of Crisis (tentative date and title)
By: Dr. Anthony Stefanidis, Director, Center for Geospatial Intelligence, Professor, Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University (RSVP)  Abstract available soon!

 

 

 

January 24, 2019The Science of How People Change: Stories from Those Who Have Been Incarcerated

By Dr. Faye Taxman, University Professor, Criminology, Law and Society, Director, Center for Advancing Correctional Excellence, George Mason University (RSVP) 

Change is an elusive concept.  This talk will feature an interactive intervention that focuses on how to bring about change by helping individuals look at their social groups, lifestyle issues, and choices they make.  The emphasis is on increasing awareness as part of a strategy to change options.  This way change becomes more of an option than an illusion.

 

February 21, 2019: Earth's Climate, Where Has It Come From and Where Is It Going?
By: Dr. Natalie Burls, Assistant Professor of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Earth Sciences, College of Science, George Mason University (RSVP)

Weather is the thunderstorm that rolled in over the horizon yesterday; climate is the statistics of weather - its warmer in summer than winter, and at the equator than at the poles. The owner and their dog analogy is often used. The movements of the dog are chaotic and hard to predict but the owner is steering it in a predictable direction - much like the sun and other “forcings” acting on Earth’s climate to steer the behavior of our chaotic weather patterns. It is important to make this distinction between weather and climate because I can confidently predict that it will be much colder in six months time but can’t tell you if it will rain next week Friday. The sun is a pretty powerful owner. The seasonal cycle is a very repetitive and predictable element of Earth’s climate because of the regular trip we make around the Sun. Reconstructions of past climate change over the last 5 million years tell about other important forcings, which like the sun can steer Earth’s climate, such as the waxing and waning of ice sheets and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere. We are currently conducting a huge experiment with one of these forcings, atmospheric CO2 concentrations. In this lecture, we will explore what the last 5 million years can tell us about the influence of CO2 on Earth’s climate.

 

March 21, 2019: Sports-Related Concussion and Kids: Staying Ahead of the Game

By: Dr. Shane Caswell,  Professor and Co-director, Sports Medicine Assessment Research and Testing (S.M.A.R.T.) Laboratory, George Mason University (RSVP)  Abstract available soon!

 

 

 

 

 

April 18, 2019: Fighting Addiction
By: Dr. Lora Peppard, Associate Professor of Nursing, Project Director for 3 federally funded behavioral health and integration grants, George Mason University (RSVP)  Abstract available soon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 16, 2019: The NASA/New Horizons Flyby of Dwarf Ice Planet 2014MU69 (Ultima Thule): Our New View of the Outer Solar System 

By: Dr. Michael Summers, Professor, Physics and Astronomy Department,  College of Science, George Mason University (RSVP)Anchor  Abstract available soon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Contact Us

Andrea Cobb, Ph.D., George Mason College of Science,  Director of Student Research and Internships,
Phone: (703) 993-7058
Email: acobb4@gmu.edu